Castle Cary Community Primary School

Castle Cary School

I love the surroundings of the school, it really makes it enjoyable to come to school here.

Year 3 Pupil

The teachers are funny and my friends are too!

Year 3 Pupil

Everyone is caring

Year 5 Pupil

I like it at our school because we do lots of work.

Year 2 Pupil

I like that it's about the children's rights and not just the teachers!

Year 6 Pupil

It's safe, fun and you always learn something new.

Year 5 Pupil

I love it at this school, nothing needs to be changed.

Year 3 Pupil

It's a great place to learn/

Year 3 Pupil

Everyone gets treated fairly; the whole school is kind.

Year 4 Pupil

Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School Life at Castle Cary Community Primary School

Pupil Premium

Castle Cary Community Primary School

 

Pupil Premium Summary

Castle Cary Community Primary School is committed to closing the gap between disadvantaged children and other children.

  • For the financial year 2016- 2017, the school received £55,020 in Pupil Premium Grant, with 41 pupils eligible.
  • For the financial year 2017-2018, the school received £48,420 in Pupil premium Grant with 35 pupils eligible.

Expenditure of Pupil Premium Grant funding is established within the school, being used to support children to close the gap on their peers. The funding use is personalised to meet the needs of the individuals; children who may be working at or above the expected level are offered tuition and experiences to develop their learning at their own level.

All staff are aware which children in their classes are eligible for Pupil Premium and are held to account for the progress of the individuals, as is the case for all children. Children who are at the risk of underperformance are clearly identified and discussed at length during termly pupil progress meeting s and much more regular informal discussions.  Children are also identified and monitored to accelerate progress if they are currently on track to achieve at least in line with expectations.

 

How has this been spent?

  • 1:1 Pupil tuition
  • Provision and resourcing of 1:1 support
  • Additional support staff
  • Small group support
  • ELSA support/ training
  • Funding support staff across the school, enhancing the provision of first quality teaching and targeted intervention
  • Financial support for enriching curricular experiences
  • Working with Beanstalk to develop reading for Service PP children
  • Development of Early Interventions with Pre-schools – Early Talk Boost training

What outcomes do we expect?

    • Accelerated progress
    • Children to progress towards their end of year targets
    • Increase in the progress measures for PP children
    • Meet the statutory targets for Key Stage 2
    • Standards in Y3 & 4 to continue an improvement trend
    • More children in KS1 to gain the expected standard or better
    • The quality of teaching to be consistently good or better across the school

A research based approach

Alongside our extensive knowledge of our pupils, we have used research presented in the EEF Teaching and Learning Toolkit to support of plans for spending the grant funding to ensure value for money and best possible impact on learning.

EEF Approach reference

EEF average impact

EEF summary of interventions

School approach and impact:

Cost to school

Behaviour interventions

+4 months

Moderate impact for moderate cost

Nurture provision/ additional MDSA/ for Key stage 1 children/ specialist intervention

£17512

Collaborative learning

+5 months

Moerate impact for very low cost

Our Path education research project with Year 4/5 (focus year groups)

Whole school CPD on benefits of collaborative learning

£800

Feedback

+8 months

High impact for low cost

Amendment to school policy for feedback. CPD to develop quality of written feedback.

 

Mastery learning

+ 5 months

Moderate impact for low cost

Whole school approach to maths

£1200 resources

One to one tuition

+5 months

Moderate impact for high cost

3 days 1:1 tuition for Key Stage 1 and 2 focused on individuals’ needs

£23,502

Outdoor adventure learning

+5 months

Moderate impact for moderate cost

Support for children eligible for PPG to enable them to attend the Year 6 residential visit.

Subsidy for educational visits.

£5,000

Phonics

+4 months

Moderate impact for low cost

CPD, specialist training and resources.

£500

Reading comprehension strategies

+3 months

Moderate impact for low cost

In line with our School Development Plan, reading identified as priority focus area. Investment in Accelerated Reader for all, to enhance the reading culture children eligible for PPG are exposed to resources provided

£2500

Small group tuition

+4 moths

Moderate impact for moderate cost

Year 5 and 6 booster teacher

£5000

The school keeps a small proportion of the budget to allow for adjustments and additional in year PPG spending needs.

Detail:

One to One tuition                                      EEF average impact: + 5 months

Two experienced teachers are employed to offer 1:1 and small group tuition on focussed personalised issues identified through data scrutiny and pupil progress meetings

Collaborative learning                              EEF average impact: + 5 months 

The school have bought the services of Jules Offord (Our Path Education) to support our provision for more able learners. Staff have had training on collaborative strategies and undertaken and reviewed a whole school project. Dove Class have undertaken an action research project with Jules. Lesson observation and learning walks demonstrate that opportunities for collaborative working are being built into lesson with much greater regularity and this is reflected in the quality of interactions the children are having.

Feedback                                                     EEF average impact: + 8 months 

The use of good questioning to feedback to the children has long been a focus for teachers, more recently though, we have worked really hard to develop the quality and function of our written feedback (marking). Staff training and development has taken place and a new policy has been implemented. Staff have developed support sheets for marking. Children are given specific periods within the school day to respond to their marking.

Mastery Learning                                     EEF average impact: + 5 months 

Staff training and curriculum development time, as well as moderation and monitoring have ensured that the school’s implementation of mastery learning in maths has been effective. Standards have improved, particularly for the younger children. The school will be continuing to use this approach next year.

Phonics                                                         EEF average impact: + 4 months 

A priority for the school, standards in phonics have improved significantly due to the focussed interventions and planned approach led by a middle leader, Jade Robertson. Staff have had specialist phonics training from Ann Harvey (Somerset Literacy Network)and implemented this approach into daily phonics teaching which in turn is embedded in everyday teaching.

Following a falling trend for the last two years at Year 1 to below the national, as well as 0% disadvantaged achieving the expected standard last year, standards have dramatically improved. 100% of disadvantaged children (5) and 93% of year 1s overall have reached the expected standard.  This is a sharp rise from 72% in 2015.

The children with PPG/SEN crossover are provided with interventions at their own level from specialist TAs and external agencies.

Context

 

June 2016

September 2016

January 2017

% of school eligible for Pupil premium

17%

17%

17%

% of school on SEN register

15%

16%

16%

% of pupils eligible for PPG are on the SEN register

37%

31%

31%

The school has a disproportionate number of children eligible for Pupil Premium funding who are also on the SEN register, making direct comparisons regarding closing the gap less reliable. Therefore in the data sets below, the data is split into ‘all PPG children’ and ‘non-SEN PPG children’.

Attendance:

 

School 2015

School 2016

National 2016

Total absence

% of sessions missed

4.6

4.6

5.4

Persistent absentees (missing 15% or more)

0

0

5.4

Persistent absentees (missing 10% or more)

-

13

-

 

Attainment: mid-year and end of year data.

Reading

December 2015

June 2016

% non-SEN PPG children working at the expected level or above

91

88

% of total PPG children working at the expected level or above

64

71

Writing

December 2015

June 2016

% non-SEN PPG children working at the expected level or above

87

92

% of total PPG children working at the expected level or above

64

63

Maths

December 2015

June 2016

% non-SEN PPG children working at the expected level or above

83

83

% of total PPG children working at the expected level or above

57

71

 Pupil Premium data for July 2016

 

 

Reading School Reading National Writing School Writing National  Maths School Maths National
Year 1 phonics

school: 100% reached expected standard.

National: 70% reached expected standard

Year 2 pupil premium 67% 78% 33% 70% 67% 77%
Year 6 Pupil premium 29% 71% 57%Year  79% 57% 75%